The Quick Guide for Vegetarians and Vegans
© 2016 VegetarianVegan.com

Vegan vs Vegetarian

What is the Difference Between Vegans and Vegetarians

Vegetarianism and Veganism are often used interchangeably. The problem is that vegans and vegetarians have a completely different set of dietary restrictions they must follow. While both will consume large amounts of vegetables, there are variances in the diet. In fact, you’ll find that even a “vegetarian” can be broken down into smaller categories that may seem confusing at first. But by the end of this, you’ll have a complete understanding of what each item is. Let’s begin with the vegan vs vegetarian comparison. The vegan is a very defined diet category and was coined by Donald Watson in 1944. Under no circumstances will a vegan consume anything that contains animal products or by products created by animals. While some will avoid items like yeast and honey, others will consume these foods. Since many in the community often consider being a vegan a lifestyle, they will also avoid any products that are made from animals and their by-products. Vegans may decide to approach this lifestyle due to their ethical beliefs. But there are some who become a vegan due to their dietary restrictions. They may have allergies to dairy or meat proteins and the vegan diet is suitable for their needs. Speaking of proteins, there is a common misconception that all protein must come from meat or dairy products. The truth is that vegans can get their protein from several different sources. This includes soy, hemp seeds, quiona, chia and peas. This understanding is important to keep in mind as you look at the difference between vegans and vegetarians. A vegetarian is very different from being a vegan. While a vegan does follow a vegetarian diet, there are still variances that are allowed. There are lactovegetarians, lacto-ovovegetarians, and even semi vegetarians. When someone claims they are a “vegetarian” you need to understand this is a blanket term. The problem is that based on the definition, it is someone who doesn’t eat fish, meat, poultry or seafood. Some won’t eat gelatin, others might eat fish. The definitions do have factors that crossover, so it is important to look at those since they further break things down while exploring vegan vs vegetarian diets. A semi vegetarian is an individual who will consume a limited amount of dairy products and fish. In some cases, they may also eat chicken. They will not consume any other meats though on their diet. Their predominate diet is vegetables. When meat is consumed it is done so for the protein value and often in small quantities. Another term for the semi vegetarian is flexitarian. When a vegetarian consumes dairy products as part of their diet, they are said to be ovo-lactovegetarians. The dairy products are still consumed in moderation, but there is no belief that the eggs or dairy products bring any harm to the animals. The ovo-lactovegetarians are the largest group of vegetarians that are in the world. Lacto-vegetarians are those who allow milk in their diet. These individuals would ultimately be considered vegan if they did not consume any milk at all. If these individuals consumed eggs but did not consume milk, they would fall into the ovo-vegetarian category instead. The actual form of vegetarianism you choose would depend on your dietary and ethical decisions. Let’s take a moment to take a closer look at the different types. Vegan Can consume all plant based foods. Cannot consume meat, poultry, fish, milk, eggs, cheese or honey. Strict vegans will avoid leather, si;l. fur, wool, cosmetics, and other items that contain animal products. Lacto-Vegetarian Can consume plant based foods, milk, cheese, yogurt, and other milk based products. Cannot consume meat, poultry, fish, and eggs. Lacto-Ovo Vegetarian Can consume plant based foods, milk and milk products, cheese, yogurt, and eggs. Cannot consume meat, poultry and fish. Flexitarian Can consume plant based foods and can consume meat, fish, eggs, milk and similar products in moderation. However, animal products are only consumed in small quantities and on rare occasions. To give you a better idea of how this works, we’ll look at a standard breakfast for each option. This can give you some additional insight into each of these different groups. A vegan breakfast would contain a piece of toast topped with mashed pinto beans, avocado, and sliced onion on it. A lacto-vegetarian breakfast would contain a peach with the insides scooped out. Granola would be baked into it and it would be served with a glass of milk. An ovo-vegetarian diet would consist of something like a spinach and mushroom frittata. In the case of an ovo-lactovegetarian breakfast would likely include cheese blended into the dish or a glass of milk. The same dish for a flexitarian may have some sausage crumble blended in with the egg for additional substance. This should help you to better understand the difference between vegans and vegetarians, including the subcategories that are there. With this understanding, you are able to better provide a healthy diet for those who fall in each of these categories, or determine which will best meet your unique dietary needs.
Resources: Becoming Vegan: The Complete Guide to Adopting a Healthy Plant- based Diet by Brenda Davis, Vesanto Melina (2000) The New Becoming Vegetarian: The Essential Guide To A Healthy Vegetarian Diet.
Vegan vs Vegetarian
Vegetarian Recipes Vegetarian Recipes
© 2016 VegetarianVegan.com

Vegan

vs

Vegetarian

What is the Difference Between

Vegans and Vegetarians

Vegetarianism and Veganism are often used interchangeably. The problem is that vegans and vegetarians have a completely different set of dietary restrictions they must follow. While both will consume large amounts of vegetables, there are variances in the diet. In fact, you’ll find that even a “vegetarian” can be broken down into smaller categories that may seem confusing at first. But by the end of this, you’ll have a complete understanding of what each item is. Let’s begin with the vegan vs vegetarian comparison. The vegan is a very defined diet category and was coined by Donald Watson in 1944. Under no circumstances will a vegan consume anything that contains animal products or by products created by animals. While some will avoid items like yeast and honey, others will consume these foods. Since many in the community often consider being a vegan a lifestyle, they will also avoid any products that are made from animals and their by-products. Vegans may decide to approach this lifestyle due to their ethical beliefs. But there are some who become a vegan due to their dietary restrictions. They may have allergies to dairy or meat proteins and the vegan diet is suitable for their needs. Speaking of proteins, there is a common misconception that all protein must come from meat or dairy products. The truth is that vegans can get their protein from several different sources. This includes soy, hemp seeds, quiona, chia and peas. This understanding is important to keep in mind as you look at the difference between vegans and vegetarians. A vegetarian is very different from being a vegan. While a vegan does follow a vegetarian diet, there are still variances that are allowed. There are lactovegetarians, lacto- ovovegetarians, and even semi vegetarians. When someone claims they are a “vegetarian” you need to understand this is a blanket term. The problem is that based on the definition, it is someone who doesn’t eat fish, meat, poultry or seafood. Some won’t eat gelatin, others might eat fish. The definitions do have factors that crossover, so it is important to look at those since they further break things down while exploring vegan vs vegetarian diets. A semi vegetarian is an individual who will consume a limited amount of dairy products and fish. In some cases, they may also eat chicken. They will not consume any other meats though on their diet. Their predominate diet is vegetables. When meat is consumed it is done so for the protein value and often in small quantities. Another term for the semi vegetarian is flexitarian. When a vegetarian consumes dairy products as part of their diet, they are said to be ovo- lactovegetarians. The dairy products are still consumed in moderation, but there is no belief that the eggs or dairy products bring any harm to the animals. The ovo-lactovegetarians are the largest group of vegetarians that are in the world. Lacto-vegetarians are those who allow milk in their diet. These individuals would ultimately be considered vegan if they did not consume any milk at all. If these individuals consumed eggs but did not consume milk, they would fall into the ovo-vegetarian category instead. The actual form of vegetarianism you choose would depend on your dietary and ethical decisions. Let’s take a moment to take a closer look at the different types. Vegan Can consume all plant based foods. Cannot consume meat, poultry, fish, milk, eggs, cheese or honey. Strict vegans will avoid leather, si;l. fur, wool, cosmetics, and other items that contain animal products. Lacto-Vegetarian Can consume plant based foods, milk, cheese, yogurt, and other milk based products. Cannot consume meat, poultry, fish, and eggs. Lacto-Ovo Vegetarian Can consume plant based foods, milk and milk products, cheese, yogurt, and eggs. Cannot consume meat, poultry and fish. Flexitarian Can consume plant based foods and can consume meat, fish, eggs, milk and similar products in moderation. However, animal products are only consumed in small quantities and on rare occasions. To give you a better idea of how this works, we’ll look at a standard breakfast for each option. This can give you some additional insight into each of these different groups. A vegan breakfast would contain a piece of toast topped with mashed pinto beans, avocado, and sliced onion on it. A lacto-vegetarian breakfast would contain a peach with the insides scooped out. Granola would be baked into it and it would be served with a glass of milk. An ovo-vegetarian diet would consist of something like a spinach and mushroom frittata. In the case of an ovo- lactovegetarian breakfast would likely include cheese blended into the dish or a glass of milk. The same dish for a flexitarian may have some sausage crumble blended in with the egg for additional substance. This should help you to better understand the difference between vegans and vegetarians, including the subcategories that are there. With this understanding, you are able to better provide a healthy diet for those who fall in each of these categories, or determine which will best meet your unique dietary needs. Resources: Becoming Vegan: The Complete Guide to Adopting a Healthy Plant-based Diet by Brenda Davis, Vesanto Melina (2000) The New Becoming Vegetarian: The Essential Guide To A Healthy Vegetarian Diet.
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